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Frequently Asked Questions


How to Install Lucida Fonts

On a Mac -  
1) Move the downloaded font to your desktop or a convenient folder. 
2) Double-click on the font icon, which will pop open a Font Book window with the name of the font and a sample. 
3) Select (Install Font) in the Font Book font window, which will install the font and open the main Font Book window and show     the font installed.  
4) Some applications will need to be shut down and re-started in order to find newly installed fonts.  
In Font Book preferences, you can set the default installation location to User or Computer. Choose User if you are the only person to use  your computer. You can find your the font files installed this way in the folder: 
HD > Users > You (User) > Library > Fonts 
Font Book installation runs a validation process, and if a problem is found, it opens a Font Validation window. On the highlighted font, read the alert notice to see what problem(s) have been identified. If the problem involves a font with the identical name already installed, Font Book will give options for how to proceed.  
Help in using Font Book can be found by using the Font Book “Help” menu, and additional information is available at Apple Support:
http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2509?viewlocale=en_US&locale=en_US 
You can bypass Font Book by dragging fonts in and out of your “User > Library > Fonts” folder, but this may corrupt the record your system keeps of which fonts are installed and de-installed, so it is safer to use Font Book.

 

On a Windows PC - 
1) Move the downloaded font to your desktop or a convenient temporary folder. 
2) Locate the Windows Fonts folder at: 
Computer > Local Disk (C:) > Windows > Fonts. 
3) Drag the font file (icon) into the Fonts folder.

      On a Linux/Unix system.
 
      1. Create a folder in your home (/home/username) named .fonts (please mind the dot). 

      If the folder exists go to the next step.
 
      2. Copy the fonts in this folder. Installation for the user 'username' is complete.

      Some applications may need to restart to find the new fonts.
      Notice that dot folders do not appear in your file browser (they are hidden under Linux/Unix). 

      To view them you have to tell the file browser to show hidden files (usually with View→Show  

      Hidden Files).
     
      If you prefer to use the command line then the commands are:
      cd ~
      mkdir -p .fonts
      cp /path/to/fontfiles/Lucida*ttf .fonts/

  What's the difference between Lucida Grande, Lucida Sans Unicode,
and Lucida Sans?

All three families are based on the original Lucida Sans released in 1985. Lucida Sans was designed for improved legibility on computer screens at text sizes between 8 to 16 point. Its letter forms are uncomplicated, its form groups differentiated, its internal spaces generous, and its spacing open, all of which help reading on screens.

Between these three Lucida sans-serif families, the differences are in repertoires of weights and styles, character sets, and a few design changes made to a few characters over the years. 

In approximate chronological order:

1)  Lucida Sans as distributed by Adobe today has a repertoire of four fonts: roman, italic, bold roman, and bold italic. These are closest to the original release of the family. Lucida Sans italics are “true” cursive italics, derived from Renaissance cursive handwriting, not slanted versions of romans. The “bold” weight is twice as bold as the normal, needed for clear emphasis on early computer screens and printers.  (Note that “bold” in the Adobe version is the same weight as “black” in the later Lucida Font Store family. ) Lucida fonts from Adobe are now in OpenType-CFF format and contain the “Std” (Standard) character set including Unicode Basic Latin and Latin-1 character blocks, with additional punctuation, ligatures, miscellaneous signs and symbols, and a few Greek capitals.

2) Lucida Sans as distributed by Microsoft in TrueType format has a repertoire of four fonts: roman, italic, demibold roman, demibold italic. The demibold is 1.5 times as bold as the regular weight, halfway between the regular weight and the original bold. Italics are true cursives. The character set includes Unicode Basic Latin and Latin1 character blocks, with standard Windows and Macintosh characters. Depending on Microsoft's release version, these Lucida Sans fonts may also contain characters from Unicode Latin Extended-A with additional signs, symbols, and graphic characters. 

3) Lucida Sans in PostScript Type 1 format from the TeX Users Group (TUG), originally produced by Y&Y in 1993, has a repertoire of six fonts: roman, italic, demibold roman, demibold italic, bold roman, bold italic. The demibold is 1.5 times as bold as the regular weight, and the bold, which is twice the weight of the normal, as in the Adobe versions. The fonts in PostScript Type 1 format include Unicode Basic Latin and Latin-1 blocks, plus standard standard WIndows and Macintosh characters. They are still available from TUG:

https://www.tug.org/store/lucida/type1.html

TUG also offers equivalent Lucida Sans fonts in OpenType-CFF format, in four fonts: roman, italic, demibold roman & demibold italic, which are part of a large set of mathematical fonts. 

https://www.tug.org/store/lucida/opentype.html

4) Lucida Sans Unicode is a family of one font, developed by Bigelow & Holmes as a demo font for Microsoft to show that broad Unicode coverage is possible within a single TrueType font. It was the first TrueType font to contain a broad range of Latin characters along with Unicode blocks of non-Latin alphabets, including Greek, Cyrillic, and Hebrew, all designed by B&H to harmonize with the Latin design and with each other. The font also contains several sets of symbols and graphical characters. The single style is Regular (roman, normal weight). The design approach is described by Charles Bigelow and Kris Holmes in an article in “Electronic Publishing”:

http://cajun.cs.nott.ac.uk/compsci/epo/papers/volume6/issue3/bigelow.pdf

A French translation by Jacques André and Héloïse Tissot is in Cahiers GUTenberg:

http://cahiers.gutenberg.eu.org/cg-bin/article/CG_1995___20_81_0.pdf

5) Lucida Grande. In 1997-1999, B&H augmented Lucida Sans Unicode with more extensive non-Latin alphabets, including Arabic and Thai, and more symbol sets. Licensed by Apple, these fonts were called “Lucida Grande” in development because they were, well, "grander" than fonts limited to Latin character sets. The name was kept when the fonts became the system fonts for OS X in 2000. For Apple, the demibold weight was renamed “Bold” to conform to OS X menu layout and font choices, and for keyboard weight selection. B&H also created Italic and Black weights and oblique styles for the Lucida Grande family, but Apple released only Lucida Grande Regular and Bold fonts with OS X. After upgrades with additional characters by Bigelow & Holmes in 2005, Lucida Grande fonts contain approximately 3,400 characters each. Compared to the original Lucida Sans, a few changes are evident, including a base serif and different top serif on figure 1, a descender on @ sign, and a longer ASCII hyphen-minus (used as a hyphen in some instances but a minus in others. The font contains true hyphens as well. To reduce ambiguity, especially in computing contexts, alternate forms of capital 'I' with serifs and zero with slash, or with dot, were included in Lucida Grande in case localizers or users wished to substitute for the standard defaults, but in the release, easy substitution was not enabled. 

6) Lucida Grande for Retina displays. In 2013, B&H made a small set of modifications to Lucida Grande regular to refine it for Apple “Retina” screen displays. These modifications are nearly subliminal - they improve the look and congeniality of the face when displayed on high resolution LCD screens but most users do not notice the changes. Eagle-eyed designers and fontologists, however, can detect some changes, like slight widening and re-weighting of figures. For the Lucida Grande Bold weight, B&H produced an entirely new weight, 4% darker than the standard Bold, to distinguish it better from the regular weight in menus. This difference in weight is also nearly subliminal, just a little bit more than what psychologists call a “just noticeable difference”. This darkening was done to emphasize and better distinguish the bold weight on Retina LCD displays, which tend to erode a little bit of weight around the edges. B&H also added kerning tables to the upgraded Apple versions of Lucida Grande.

7) In 2014, Bigelow & Holmes released the largest family of LUCIDA GRANDE to date, in a repertoire of four weights and three styles. The new Lucida Grande Light weight is 75% of the Regular weight and 50% of the Bold weight. The Black weight is 200% of the Regular weight. All fonts in this release are in the  pan-European “WGL” character set, containing Unicode Basic Latin, Latin-1, Latin Extended-A, modern Greek, basic Cyrillic, and miscellaneous signs, symbols, and graphic characters. The WGL set contains approximately 660 characters. Although WGL is a smaller character set than in the OS X version of Lucida Grande, the Lucida WGL character set supports most languages of Europe and the Americas, as well as some languages of Africa and Asia. The family repertoire of Lucida Grande now includes: 

Lucida Grande Light
Lucida Grande Light Italic
Lucida Grande Light Oblique
Lucida Grande
Lucida Grande Italic
Lucida Grande Oblique
Lucida Grand Bold
Lucida Grande Bold Italic
Lucida Grande Bold Oblique
Lucida Grande Black
Lucida Grande Black Italic
Lucida Grande Black Oblique

Plus narrow versions of all of the above, 12.5% slimmer than the normal widths.  

In response to requests for monospaced versions of Lucida Grande, B&H developed a family of four LUCIDA GRANDE MONO fonts, based on Lucida Sans Typewriter, in normal and narrow widths, in the WGL character set:

Lucida Grande Mono
Lucida Grande Mono Italic
Lucida Grande Mono Bold
Lucida Grande Mono Bold Italic

8) LUCIDA SANS 2014. Screen resolutions have increased over the decades, from 60 to 72 pixels per inch in the early 1980s to more than 300 pixels per inch on smart phones today. Screen font reading is now done on wider range of devices, from monitors to laptops to tablets to e-readers to smart phones to automotive displays. Resolutions and rendering technologies now vary so widely that traditional font weights can look very different on different displays. Printing technologies have also changed greatly over the past few decades. Digital tools enable designers to make more complex and imaginative integrations of text and image. To give designers in digital realms more power to fine-tune fonts for particular contexts, and to adapt typography to new technologies and new reading environments, we expanded the weight spectrum of Lucida Sans. We developed much lighter and much darker weights, and refined the middle range of text weights into small steps of slightly different levels of darkness. The result is a suite of eighteen Lucida Sans weights with much a broader weight spectrum and much finer design control in the text portion of the spectrum. We designed true cursive italics for all eighteen weight but also added oblique (slanted) variants for all, to be used by UI and graphic designers who want a simpler “italic” in some contexts. We also produced all these weight and style suites in NARROW versions for typography when horizontal space is at a premium. All suites of weights and styles are currently offered in the Unicode Basic Latin character set. The weights of the new Lucida Sans fonts correspond to Lucida Grande weights as follows: Lucida Grande Light = Lucida Sans Lite; Lucida Grande Regular = Lucida Sans Normal; Lucida Grande Bold = Lucida Sans Bold; Lucida Grande Black = Lucida Sans Black. 

Additional information on Lucida character sets can be found on the Lucida FACTS pages: Lucida Basic Latin Character Set ("BAS”), Lucida WGL Character Set, and Lucida Weights.  

Are there Light and Black weights for Lucida Grande fonts?

Yes. LUCIDA GRANDE LIGHT and LUCIDA GRANDE BLACK fonts are available in roman, italic, and oblique styles from the Lucida Fonts Store. These newly released styles for the Lucida Grande family are offered in the pan-European WGL character set.

The LUCIDA GRANDE font family is now available in four weights: Light, Normal, Bold, and Black; and in three styles for each weight: Roman, Italic, and Oblique. Narrow versions of all four weights and three styles are also available from the Lucida Fonts Store.

Are there Italic styles for Lucida Grande fonts?

Yes. Lucida Grande Italic fonts are available in all four weights of LUCIDA GRANDE, including for Lucida Grande regular and Bold fonts bundled with Macintosh OS X. These Lucida Grande Italic fonts are in the pan-European WGL character set with Latin, Greek, and Cyrillic alphabets that support many of the world’s languages. They do not include some non-Latin alphabets and symbol sets in the Lucida Grande fonts bundled with OS X. 

Lucida Grande Italic and Bold Italic fonts are true italic designs. They are style-linked as the default italics for Lucida Grande Regular and Lucida Grande Bold. Style-linking to their roman companion fonts permits easier keyboard selection in word processing and page layout applications. 

Are there Oblique styles for Lucida Grande fonts?

Yes. Lucida Grande Oblique fonts are available in all four weights of LUCIDA GRANDE, including for Lucida Grande regular and Bold fonts bundled with Macintosh OS X. These Lucida Grande Oblique fonts from the Lucida Font Store are in the pan-European WGL character set.

Lucida Grande Oblique and Bold Oblique are oblique/slanted versions of Lucida Grande Regular and Bold. Oblique styles are usable as “italic” companions for regular and bold styles of Lucida Grande fonts, but Lucida Oblique fonts are not style-linked to the romans and are not always selectable by keyboard commands but can be selected from font menus. 

What is the difference between Lucida Italic and Lucida Oblique fonts?

Lucida Italic fonts are true italic designs. Their letterforms derive from cursive (= “running”) handwriting of the Italian Renaissance and show traces of handwritten pen strokes in the curves of arches and in non-roman forms of letters ‘a’, ‘f’, and ‘g’. Many italic letters, including b, d, p, q, h, m, n, u are different between italic and roman, and between italic and oblique forms.

Lucida Oblique fonts are slanted versions of Lucida roman fonts. The letterforms of roman and oblique have the same basic constructions, but the oblique versions are slanted (also called inclined or sloped). Lucida Oblique fonts are slanted like the italic designs but do not have cursive forms. 

How to choose between Italic and Oblique fonts? 

The choice of Italic or Oblique styles is a matter of visual taste. True Italic faces look lively and elegant; Oblique faces look calm and functional. LUCIDA SANS, LUCIDA CASUAL, and LUCIDA GRANDE font families offer both Italic and Oblique versions for all weights. Users looking for inclined styles can choose the look that best fits the rhythm, pattern, theme or mood of a typographic composition.

What is "Style-linking"?

In many font families, italic fonts are linked to corresponding roman/regular fonts and can be selected by keyboard commands instead of font menus. In some word processing and page layout programs in OS X, text can be switched from roman to italic style by selecting text and pressing the <command>i key. Related keyboard commands are found on Windows.

Lucida Italic fonts are style-linked to their corresponding weights of Lucida roman fonts. 

But, most operating systems and applications do not support two “italic” style-links for a single roman, so Lucida Oblique fonts are not style-linked to corresponding roman fonts. They are treated like “regular” fonts and can be selected from the menus.

What is the character set of Lucida Grande fonts in the Lucida Fonts Store?

Lucida Grande fonts from the Lucida Fonts Store contain the WGL character set. The WGL set includes modern Latin, Greek, and Cyrillic alphabets plus additional symbols to support a large number of the world’s languages. 

What does the "W" in Lucida Grande W and Lucida Grande Bold W mean? 

The “W” in those font names  distinguishes Lucida Store fonts, which contain the WGL character set, from the Lucida Grande Regular and Bold fonts bundled with OS X, which contain a larger character set.

If you are using an OS X system, you currently do not need to license Lucida Grande Regular or Bold from the Lucida Store. Apple already provides those fonts in OS X. You should not install the “W” versions of Lucida Grande Regular and Bold on your OS X system, to avoid system font conflicts. 

If you are using Windows or Unix, or other systems and want Lucida Grande Regular and Bold, the “W” versions from the Lucida Store are the same designs, in the WGL character set.

What are Lucida Basic fonts?

Lucida Basic fonts offer extended suites of weights and styles for greater expressiveness in texts, displays, advertising, signage, and other usages. The weight and style ranges of Lucida designs range from very bold weights (= UltraBlack) to very thin weights (= UltraThin), with many medium, bold and light weights in-between. Fine gradations of weight are available in the middle text ranges (= Book, Text, Thick, ExtraThick) . These enable more precise fine-tuning of the tones of text blocks on a wide range of printing media and digital displays.

Because of their wide range of weights, the names of Lucida Basic fonts include numbers as well as weight terms to help distinguish the faces. See LUCIDA BASIC FONT WEIGHTS.

What is the character set (repertoire) of Lucida Basic fonts?

Lucida Basic fonts contain the Unicode Basic Latin character set or repertoire, including capitals and lower-case, numerals, punctuation, and symbols like @ # $ % & *, plus additional quote marks. The Lucida Basic Latin character set is equivalent to the American Standard Code for Information Interchange set (ASCII), a U.S. standard for 45 years.

What are Lucida Narrow fonts?

Narrow fonts save horizontal space and have a higher frequency visual rhythm. All Lucida font families from the Lucida Store have Narrow versions. Because the narrowing is conservative, Lucida Narrow fonts do not look too condensed. For proportionally-spaced Lucida fonts, the Narrow versions are 87.5% (= 7/8) of the width of the normal-width faces. This means that 14% more characters can fit into the same column width or line length used for the normal width version. 

What are Lucida monospaced fonts?

Lucida Grande Mono, Lucida Console, and Lucida Retro monospaced fonts have all characters on the same width, like legacy typewriters, computer printers, and console displays. Monospacing makes font easy to use in a wide range of computing and business applications, like spreadsheets.

Lucida Narrow monospaced fonts have narrow versions that are 80% of the normal versions. This means that 25% more characters can fit into the same column width or line length used for the normal width version. 

Why so many weights in Lucida Basic fonts?

Typeface weight has many functions. Bold weights can be strong and emphatic; light weights weights can be elegant or understated. Text weights can make a pleasing gray tone on a page. Some weight variations are better adapted to some kinds of printing, while other weights work better on some kinds of screen displays. The broad range of Lucida weights enables users and designers to choose and use weights best suited to particular usages. 

What font formats are offered in the Lucida Fonts Store?

All fonts currently offered in the Lucida Store are in standard TrueType font format. 

Are fonts from The Lucida Fonts Store "hinted"?

Hinting (or grid-fitting instruction) adjusts font rendering on low and medium resolution devices, to force letter shapes to conform to digital grids. Higher resolutions of recent computer screens and printers means that hinting is not needed on many platforms. On high-resolution screens, anti-aliasing technology, also called smoothing or gray-scaling, blurs the sharp edges of letters to make "jaggies" imperceptible. Anti-aliased high-res screens and high resolution printers (~600 dpi) usually do not need hinting, so fonts from the Lucida Store do not include hints; this makes the fonts render faster, more economical in storage, and less prone to errors from bugs in hinting code.

Are some Lucida fonts already on my computer?

Yes, some styles and weights of Lucida are bundled with different operating systems and applications. Here is a brief guide to what you may already have on your system, with suggestions of complementary or supplemental fonts offered in the Lucida Store.

Apple Macintosh OS X versions 10.1 to 10.9 
Bundled Lucida Fonts = Lucida Grande Regular and Bold 

Complementary fonts for Lucida Grande from the Lucida Store  
Lucida Grande Italic and Oblique
Lucida Grande Bold Italic and Bold Oblique
Lucida Grande Light, Light Italic, Light Oblique
Lucida Grande Black, Black Italic, Black Oblique
Lucida Grande Narrow Regular, Italic and Oblique
Lucida Grande Narrow Bold Regular, Italic and Oblique
Lucida Grande Narrow Light, Italic, and Oblique
Lucida Grande Narrow Black, Italic, Oblique

Microsoft Windows (most versions since 1994)
Bundled Lucida Fonts = Lucida Console Regular, Lucida Sans Unicode

Complementary (add-on) fonts for Lucida Console from the Lucida Store
Lucida Console Italic, Bold, and Bold Italic
Lucida Console Narrow Regular, Italic, Bold, and Bold Italic

Complementary (add-on) fonts for Lucida Sans Unicode
There are no exact weight/style complements to Lucida Sans Unicode, but Lucida Grande fonts offer the same design and provide a large set (WGL) of characters for Windows. 

Lucida Grande W (Regular), Italic and Oblique
Lucida Grande Bold W (Regular), Italic and Bold Oblique
Lucida Grande Light Regular, Light Italic, Light Oblique
Lucida Grande Black Regular, Black Italic, Black Oblique
Lucida Grande Narrow Regular, Italic and Oblique
Lucida Grande Narrow Bold Regular, Italic and Oblique
Lucida Grande Narrow Light Regular, Italic, and Oblique
Lucida Grande Narrow Black Regular, Italic, Oblique

Microsoft Office (2010, 2007, 2003) 
Bundled Lucida Fonts = Lucida Calligraphy, Lucida Handwriting, Lucida Sans, Lucida Sans Typewriter, Lucida Fax, Lucida Bright

Thirty new fonts of LUCIDA CALLIGRAPHY are now available from the Lucida Store, ranging from Thin to Ultra Black, in normal and narrow widths. If you like the elegant but legible look of Lucida Calligraphy, you may also like many of its new weights.

Thirty new fonts of LUCIDA HANDWRITING are now available from the Lucida Store, ranging from Thin to Ultra Black, in normal and narrow widths. If you like the lively and playful look of Lucida Handwriting, you may also like many of its new weights.

One hundred and eight new fonts of LUCIDA SANS are now available from the Lucida Store, ranging from Ultra Thin to Ultra Black, in roman, italic, and oblique styles, in normal and narrow widths. These new fonts extend the range of Lucida Sans for a much broader range of applications in print and on screen.

Ninety new fonts of LUCIDA CASUAL are now available from the Lucida Store, ranging from Thin to Ultra Black, in roman, italic, and casual styles, and normal and narrow widths. If you like the friendly look of Lucida Casual, you may also like many of its new weights.

Where are the Lucida Math fonts?

Examples of some of the Lucida Math characters and symbols are on the MATH FONTS page in the Lucida Fonts Store. 

Lucida Math font sets in OpenType and PostScript Type1 formats are distributed by TUG - the TeX Users Group - and by Personal TeX Inc. - publisher of PCTeX. Both of these external sites provide type specimens, descriptions, examples, and documentation for Lucida Math fonts. Both sites specialize in TeX related math software, but the Lucida Math fonts are in standard formats and can also be used with other applications.  

TUG distributes Lucida Math fonts in OpenType and PostScript Type1 formats: http://tug.org/store/lucida/

With additional information here: http://tug.org/store/lucida/opentype.html

PCTeX distributes Lucida Math font set in PostScript Type1 formats: http://pctex.com/Lucida_Fonts.html  

With additional documentation here: http://www.pctex.com/Lucida_Fonts.html#Lucimatx_Documentation  

An older set of Lucida Math fonts, with weights adjusted to the original Lucida seriffed fonts, is distributed by Adobe.

How to Install Lucida Fonts

On a Mac - 
1) Move the downloaded font to your desktop or a convenient folder.
2) Double-click on the font icon, which will pop open a Font Book window with the name of the font and a sample.
3) Select (Install Font) in the Font Book font window, which will install the font and open the main Font Book window and show     the font installed. 
4) Some applications will need to be shut down and re-started in order to find newly installed fonts. 
In Font Book preferences, you can set the default installation location to User or Computer. Choose User if you are the only person to use  your computer. You can find your the font files installed this way in the folder:
HD > Users > You (User) > Library > Fonts
Font Book installation runs a validation process, and if a problem is found, it opens a Font Validation window. On the highlighted font, read the alert notice to see what problem(s) have been identified. If the problem involves a font with the identical name already installed, Font Book will give options for how to proceed. 
Help in using Font Book can be found by using the Font Book “Help” menu, and additional information is available at Apple Support:
http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2509?viewlocale=en_US&locale=en_US
You can bypass Font Book by dragging fonts in and out of your “User > Library > Fonts” folder, but this may corrupt the record your system keeps of which fonts are installed and de-installed, so it is safer to use Font Book.

On a Windows PC -
1) Move the downloaded font to your desktop or a convenient temporary folder.
2) Locate the Windows Fonts folder at:
Computer > Local Disk (C:) > Windows > Fonts.
3) Drag the font file (icon) into the Fonts folder.

 

      On a Linux/Unix system.

 

      1. Create a folder in your home (/home/username) named .fonts

      (please mind the dot). If the folder exists go to the next step.

 

      2. Copy the fonts in this folder. Installation for the user 'username'

      is complete. Some applications may need to restart to find the new fonts.

      Notice that dot folders do not appear in your file browser (they are

      hidden under Linux/Unix). To view them you have to tell the file browser to

      show hidden files (usually with View→Show Hidden Files).

      If you prefer to use the command line then the commands are:

      cd ~

      mkdir -p .fonts

      cp /path/to/fontfiles/Lucida*ttf .fonts/